Here’s how Indian Influence win Hearts Globally

 

In a phase of being Indian, when all I can read and watch is modernization and being super cool through fake acts, there are layers of being Indian much deeper than owning an iPhone or a Mercedes. Well, way before the materialistic ramp walk turns on, we go through a series of teachings and ethics. No matter, how much the world may transform to resemble like the Wall-E movie, we still make sure that the kids are taught to say Namaste and bow to take blessings from elder people by touching their feet.

Being “desi” has started to appear on all the merchandise with auto rickshaws and chaatwalas printed all over them, and sure enough, is winning millions of Indian hearts. I have read several decor books from across the globe and it was surprising to see images of framed Indian Gods placed on the shelves of renowned international interior designers. It is very interesting to go through each trace that leads to the fact of how much Indian ideologies have influenced people globally. Currently, the influence seeks no boundary viz. from food recipes to yoga practices, to khadi and organic clothing to Ayurveda to what not.

Among a lot of credo(s), there are few that I still remember from my childhood. Especially passed onto us by Gandhiji “See no evil, Hear no evil and Speak no evil” (the famous three monkeys) and “an eye for an eye, makes the whole world blind”. These incontrovertibly true statements are a beginner’s guide to an Indian. Not to mention the unity in diversity. Which reminds me of a plan of mine to write a book in my engineering days… diversity in university… never mind. Ummm… where was I? Oh yes, the cultural and traditional variants speak of no difference regarding the beliefs laid on being a true Indian.

We as Indians are so much in love with Little that we ended up inventing ZERO and the Decimal System. So now you know that even Mathematics is #MoreIndianThanYouThink. We even went to another planet at the cost of traveling in an Auto Rickshaw. But, the same deeds make us save those extra pennies so that we can share them with others who are in need. Being an Indian may not let you win a situation but it will definitely make you win hearts and a lot of respect.

Let me share a story of how being an Indian made me successful and win certain situations. I am not from a family of plenty. Like most of us, life has been a great struggle for my family. In my childhood, my parents told me “There will be a time when you’ll become successful, earn respect and have all the materialistic possessions that you always dreamt of. But whenever you achieve great heights, always stay grounded.” I engraved those words in my mind and heart. I am a moderately successful blogger and a Calligraphy artist. I’ve been to various places and the power of humility made me great friends with strangers in no time. People feel instantly connected, comfortable and feel free to ask, talk and share inspirations and learnings. Had I been stern and always chin-up with carrying the baggage of accolades, I would never have earned confidence and respect of others. I may not always win but I always make a mark in everyone’s heart and for me that is the biggest achievement of all.

 

 

Being Indian is not just a metaphor or a topic of discussion or a blog post. It is a culture, a heritage that allows us to be the thread that joins the whole world together. That’s why Lufthansa’s (must-watch) new TV commercial celebrates India’s growing global influence. I believe there is a lot to cover in this topic for being an Indian, but I leave it up to you. So that you can share your experiences here in the comments.

I sincerely thank Lufthansa for a great initiative and wish them to bring millions of smiles.

2 thoughts on “Here’s how Indian Influence win Hearts Globally

  1. Good to know about your achievements (I know you stay grounded though).

    Though many Indians have earned respect, some have spoiled too…I wouldn’t mention about the nasty incidents here in the interest of a positive post.

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